Growing a reader

Inspiration - Access - Time - Skill

Helping your child to become a reader is down to YOU.

 

Let them see you read & enjoy books. Have books available for them to choose.

 

Read aloud to them, help them discover new words beyond their own capability.

Helping to encourage a reader

Previously, looking at the cover, reading the blurb were all that was needed to grab a reader. Now, with the advent of technology, we need to work that much harder.

 

You need them to WANT to read so entice them. Inspiration can come from a wide range of places:

  • Read aloud a first chapter.

  • Meeting or hearing an author talk why they wrote the book - lots available online.

  • What are they reading at school? Perhaps another book by the same author?

  • Grab the gift of one of our recommendation packs.

Having access to books chosen by the child is important.

Homes may have no books available or too many to choose from.It can be tricky when out to buy a book not to direct them to one you would prefer they read. They are more likely to read it if they chose it.

Libraries can help with choice.  With a library ticket your child can spend time choosing books & it doesn't matter if they are returned unread.

 

Research by Egmont in 2019 has shown that having free choice of reading material is really important in getting a child to read.

Do you provide time at home for reading? Time set aside just for reading when you are also reading is important.

 

In addition, to independent reading make time each day to read to your child. 

 

By reading to them you are taking the pressure off them as a reader, providing access to language that they might not yet understand & creating an  emotional connection between you & books which will stay with them for years to come.

 

Research in 2019 (Egmont) found that being read to regularly is pivotal for encouraging children to read independently.

Listen to your child read, practice their skills & have fun. 

If a child can't read well they are less likely to want to read. This means they will get less practice & not improve as quickly.

There can be lots of challenges for children with reading.

  • Good reading but poor comprehension - they can read but are unable to understand what is happening in the story.

  • Good comprehension but poor reading - what they can read they understand but lack skills to tackle more challenging words.

  • Poor reading & comprehension.

  • Can read but chooses not to.

  • Sight problems with words being unclear.

  • Difficulty in concentrating.

Image by Suad Kamardeen

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Everybody Reads CIC is a registered Community Interest Company - 12655201

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